“Mental Masturbation” is Stopping You from Achieving Greatness

Inspirational content is becoming a drug for many people. It’s over-saturating the digital market and there is absolutely no scarcity of “good” advice out there. It’s at our fingertips and we can dabble in it 24/7 — living a fantasy of how marvelous our lives could be.

Frankly, I would argue self-help has become superficial entertainment for many. It’s no longer “motivating” people to actually do anything progressive. Rather — it’s become yet another form of escapism just like drugs, alcohol, social media, and television are.

It’s a cheap high. A quick way to masturbate your mind for a dopamine spike and artificial epiphany release. “Wow, what a magnificent concept! I feel like a successful, actualized genius” is the feeling people are addicted to.

Even worse, self-help dabbling is deceivingly “healthy”  because it’s pseudo-intellectual. 

I’m here to shatter that paradigm and declare self-help is a total waste of time and mental energy if we don’t practically integrate such advice into our lives.

We can learn all concepts and theories we want, but if we don’t do anything with the information, it’s totally useless. Desensitizing our brains to content intended for pragmatic use is digging deeper into fantasy and further from reality.

What happens by over-fantasizing, is we tend to place too much emphasis on external happiness and need, and can’t find happiness within ourselves. 

Self-help works when an individual is at the cause of their actions, not the effect of their environment. Next article I will explain Cause vs. Effect and how to tell which side you may be operating in.

Generate positivity: Cut voluntary exposure to negativity on social media (and everywhere else).

Social media. Ahh. What a concept.

The current age of technology allows us to be selective. We can cherrypick content to our liking.  Subjectivity is the new objectivity.

The issue with Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, etc… is that they are all designed to make you feel bad until you use them again. It’s a modern control mechanism to encourage conformity.

Let’s be honest: The majority of the time we’re on these sites, we’re using them in an automated fashion that stems from the subconscious desire to…

a) boost and or maintain our egos

b) out of habitual addiction to see what’s going on

c) confirm our existing beliefs

Now, let’s be clear here: I don’t discourage social media. What I do encourage however, is the following:

  1. Stop following ALL negative people and pages. You are in control here, and should maximize  your mental capital by avoiding the melodrama and negativity. These people are toxic. They will only bring you down. On my Facebook, for instance, I tailored my feed so that the only people I see are family and close friends. The other people?–I just don’t care.
  2. Follow pages that are relevant to your passions. If you’re a musician, follow the local venue’s page to get a scoop on live events around you. If you’re a cook, look at the cooking magazines. If you’re into nature or photography, it’s fantastic to get a glimpse of the world around us though breathtaking pictures. Cultivate a feed that is exciting and relevant to you.
  3. Only post and share what is an expression of your happiness. It’s not to get likes, status, approval–it’s not to get anything. You are living your life and simply sharing that love. The internet is just a medium for sharing.

Once you’ve cleansed your feed, things will feel a bit different. A bit lighter. A bit happier. More inspiring. You might even be asking yourself, “Where did all of the bullshit go?!”.  

And that is perfectly normal, because we drastically underestimate the impact social conditioning has on our mental health.

It all stems from awareness. Say it with me: Awareness. Awareness. Awareness.

When we can step off the conveyor belt, assess our feelings, and take conscious control of ourselves, positive changes will blossom in our lives. We can reshape our thought patterns through engaging in healthier information.

Even the little things make a huge difference.