Being “Spiritual” is No Substitute for Psychiatric Evaluation…

I feel that I have to write this article to clear the air. Since most of my audience seems to be spiritually-inclined people, I feel obligated to present a counter argument to what I normally write about. 

A lot of people resort to spirituality in the midst of a life crisis. It helps them appreciate life in more subtle, holistic ways. Fantastic.

Many people learn to cope with alternative lifestyles, meditation, and healthy eating. Awesome.

Others have latent mental illnesses and resist psychiatric evaluation, thinking being spiritual is enough. Not good.

Let’s be real here: Mental illnesses are legitimate problems. Telling someone with mental health issues to “go meditate for a bit, smoke a blunt, and eat some kale” is dangerous. Instead of seeking professional help, they believe they can do it on their own. This is delusion, and it’s often difficult to fix once habituated.

If you or anyone you know is struggling with mental health issues, do not resist seeking professional help. I’m not saying to go around searching for a diagnosis, but just be aware of the professional support that is out there and can drastically improve the quality of your life.

Thanks for taking the time to read this article.

Peace -Seth

Why it’s Good to Have an Ego

Everybody hates on the word “Ego”. They instantly think of a smug asshole who thinks they’re better than you.

However (while those people are unfortunate to deal with), having an ego simply means “sense of self”. It’s your identity. It’s how you make sense of yourself and the world. It’s your relationship with others in a society.

Unless you go meditate on your own in caves your whole life, you’re going to need an ego to integrate with others in this world.

I hear so much of “slay the ego” in spiritual communities. People want to dissolve their sense of self and be “one with the universe”.

But frankly, that’s an extremely impractical (and dangerous) philosophy to practice in your life. Because you’re never going to completely get rid of your ego so long as you are a functioning member in society.

I’m making the argument that it’s a GOOD THING to have an ego.

Humans are tribal beings. We seek a place in society and it’s necessary to have an identity for this purpose. Our DNA is wired to be in groups.

Trying to destroy your sense of self can make it extremely difficult function in society. I see this phenomenon happen a lot with heavy psychedelic users. They think it’s helping them, but it makes it harder and harder for them to integrate back into society the more they trip.

However, there is a counter side to this argument, and I know many people (including myself) who have greatly benefited from the ego-destroying effects of psychedelics. Many people say being less attached to their ego makes life a lot less serious and less heavy…and I completely agree. Psychedelics can rewire the brain in beautiful ways and they can help people awaken and discover a greater spiritual appreciation of life.

I just want to reemphasize: You shouldn’t be ashamed of having an ego. It’s not going away, and fighting it is just playing a silly mental game with yourself.

Having a healthy ego can help you in business, relationships, jobs, hobbies, etc. Having an IDENTITY is one of the strongest motivational factors to human beings. We are motivated by how we are valued in society. This is not a bad thing.

When I say “having an ego” I do not mean possessing or becoming attached to your image. When this happens, a person becomes insecure and feels they need to brag about themselves or shove it in others faces why they’re better than you. This is an unhealthy ego — and I want to make a fine distinction here that this is not to be encouraged as it will lead to problems in life just as someone who is addicted to “dissolving” their ego may experience.

What do you think? Leave your comments below!

 

“Self – Improvement” is a Myth

Self-improvement is a very socially conditioned ideology in Western society that we like to think will make us happy — but it really doesn’t. You can’t improve who you fundamentally are. You can only accept yourself and all of your internal beauty and move forward with that knowing in life. Chasing external things (relationships, validation, love, the “need to improve”) will not bring you true fulfillment. Because it really does come from within.

Try to not judge yourself so hard. Realize that you are a fundamentally whole being as you are and there is absolutely nothing that needs to be improved about “you”. Let that knowing shine through and life will do what it’s supposed to.

You can develop skills through discipline, and get better at things. But you can’t improve “you” at the core level, so just give up on trying.

When you do come to understand this (and you will know when the time comes) you won’t feel the need to improve who you are. You will do the things you want to do in life and it won’t feel so heavy and forced.

Remember, you’re a whole being as you are. All you need to do is realize this — and go on with your life!

 

Are You Headed in the Right Direction? A Quick Way to Find Out

The best way to determine if you’re heading in the right direction is to gauge how comfortable you are in life.

If you’re cozy, you’re probably not growing or fulfilling your higher potential in life.

I use the word “uncomfortable” deliberately.

Uncomfortable in this context does not mean self-hate, nor does it imply being in a life-threatening situation.

It simply means this:

Are you ACCEPTING challenges, or are you AVOIDING challenges?

Facing adversity is a non-logical paradox. It is a paradox because it is uncomfortable, and us humans will go to great lengths to avoid discomfort. As a result, we basically stay stagnate and live unfulfilling lives.

Unfortunately, nobody ever told you that comfort and discomfort are the same thing. They are both energy. They are both polarities that have the capacity to cause great change in your life if you allow this contradiction to exist and roll with it anyways.

Steven Pressfield calls this feeling “resistance” in his book The War of Art. Resistance is that voice in your head that talks you down, fears judgement, and wants instant gratification. All of which prevent you from THRIVING and CREATING BEAUTIFUL CHANGE in your life and the lives of those around you.

Takeaway:

Read The War of Art. If you’re cozy, start challenging yourself to work hard and face your fears. You WILL adapt, and you will be amazed and intrigued by your capacity to manifest great change in life and how far you’ve come.

P.S. You can’t “think” or “logic” your way into facing your fears. I’m asking you to leap. I’m asking you to absolutely believe in yourself and trust the universe no matter what, before you have proof of anything, that everything will be okay, that everything is happening exactly as it should.

Fear is made of mist and disappears the moment you walk through it.

The Shortcut Economy

People want unrealistic shortcuts to success. They don’t care enough to embrace the process of hard work and self discovery.

This lends itself to bullshit answers being fed to bullshit people. Our culture thrives on pure bullshit.

Life is a dance you get better at by DOING. There is no “shortcut” “tip” or “tactic” to success.

Whatever advice somebody gives you is just what works for them. Use it as a guideline, but not ultimatum. Sure, guidelines are important (so is keeping an OPEN MIND and being able to receive feedback). But MANY things in life nobody has the answer to, and you will have to find that out yourself through reference experiences.

You are your own authority. The road is clear. Stop hiding. Go make what you care about happen.